Archive for November, 2013

My First Monsters

Monday, November 18th, 2013

ArtStudio for iPad has landed, peeps. And I started drawing immediately. First priority: monsters. And because I hadn’t learned many of the tools yet, they were pretty sketchy indeed:

GAAAAAAAH

GAAAAAAAH

The stylus, it is not a pen. And the iPad screen, it is not paper. Here’s the next one I made:

Rawr

Rawr

Fairly dino-like. I mean, essentially a dinosaur, yes. And a sketchy one! Soon after making this one, I discovered the zoom-in, so I was able to do repair work. Here’s how that turned out:

Rawr 2

Rawr 2

The first one is kind of . . . better, isn’t it? A lot more life in it. And yet I’m obsessively tidy, so I went on to make a bunch of other creatures with neat lines. As this is just the first batch, I’m sure there’s plenty of experimentation to come, so we’ll see what evolves. For now, my first monsters:

Pink Squawk

Pink Squawk

I think we’ve all been where this monster currently is.

Bloobie

Bloobie

Rueful little Bloobie. Such a simple design, but plenty of feeling, right? And you know I’m always going for the feelings.

Capital Fellow

Capital Fellow

This guy seems like an upstanding citizen. Pretty sure I would want to be friends with him.

Blorb

Blorb

Bit of a worrier here. I hope her day gets better.

Vraaaaah!

Vraaaaah!

Wants to be scary. Isn’t, very.

Hulky

Hulky

She’s got a lot on her shoulders, and possibly her mind. But probably not her mind.

I don’t know what’s going to happen next, but I have a feeling it will involve cuteness. One thing I discovered when making these is that, at least when it comes to images, I seem to be primarily interested in the cute. We’ll see if I can break out of that, or if I want to. After all, the power to create cuteness means that you are never without it!

New in Reads and Flicks

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

I just read what everybody else is reading:

1) Hyperbole and a Half. Pure delight. And inspiring, too. As in, illustrations of my blog entries may be in my (our) future. A lot has been said about Allie Brosh’s bravery in being so open about her depression while she’s in the middle of said depression, and I’ll add my voice to the chorus. Very impressive, Allie Brosh. I love, too, that she manages to write about depression in a way that’s both marvelous in its specificity of naming and absurd enough to allow for humor. My favorite line: “That is a solution for a problem I do not have.” I love that line. I want to use that line.

***ETA 11/6/13. When I wrote the above, I had read everything but the final entry in HaaH. And the final entry is . . . problematic. She seems to be saying that she did some in-depth emotional work and discovered that she’s a bad person. Because she has bad thoughts. Which . . . can she get a better therapist? (Does she have a therapist?) Because everyone has dark thoughts. And because there’s a deeper level, below the thoughts, that might help explain them. And it would be good if she knew that. I hope she gets to know that.

2) The Goldfinch. In the tradition of Donna Tartt, such a good yarn. A fantastic place to park your consciousness for the week or more it’ll take to get through it (784 pp.), with smart and surprising prose, an arch Victorian sensibility, and at least one character you (I) would very much love to know. Two, probably, really. I hate that James Wood (grouchy critic) called her out for her stylization in The New Yorker. (He’s against the Gothic, or at least her version of it.) I mean, that’s what she does. That said, I could have done without the final 10 – 20 pages. There seems to be an attempt at meaning-making that we don’t need.

The other problem with finishing a Donna Tartt book: the shattering awareness that you have to wait 10 years for the next one.

I just saw what no one else is seeing (except my friend Vanessa):

Don Jon. Very smartly conceived and written (by Joseph Gordon-Levitt!), although the ending is too neat. Still: a tight little composition. VERY alive on the screen, and a great snapshot of a particular subculture. Funny, smart, and surprising.